2015 Houses Awards: Emerging Architecture Practice

Click to enlarge
Sawmill House by Archier.

Sawmill House by Archier. Image: Benjamin Hosking

1 of 5
Sawmill House by Archier.

Sawmill House by Archier. Image: Benjamin Hosking

2 of 5
Otway round table and Hex downlight by Archier.

Otway round table and Hex downlight by Archier. Image: Miranda Louey

3 of 5
Piccolo coffee table by Archier.

Piccolo coffee table by Archier. Image: Miranda Louey

4 of 5
Ashfield Apartment by Archier featuring Archier's Highline pendant light and Otway dining table.

Ashfield Apartment by Archier featuring Archier’s Highline pendant light and Otway dining table. Image: Miranda Louey

5 of 5

Emerging Architecture Practice
Archier
2015 Houses Awards

Jury Comment

Archier’s idea of leveraging latent assets to drive a project and the architects’ willingness to get hands-on, whether on site or in the manufacturing of smaller-scale objects, gives the studio’s work a truly authentic vigour. The splicing together of ideas of different scales, from the harnessing of massive concrete blocks to designing delicate metal fabrications to fit the hand, shows the ability of a practice to create compelling spatial outcomes.

With the Sawmill House, the studio has shown how practice unconstrained by typical architectural precepts can produce outcomes that delight. The architects’ willingness to immerse themselves in an idea without fear of failure, in the knowledge that the outcome may well end up a better one than expected, taps into one of the great advantages of the emerging architectural position – the ability to take risks.

Archier’s ability to make the most of this position makes the practice a worthy winner of the inaugural Emerging Architecture Practice award.

See full image galleries of all the winning and shortlisted projects here

Award for Emerging Architecture Practice is supported by Blum.


More awards

Most read

Fewer walls, more life: Big Small House

Fewer walls, more life: Big Small House

Designed according to the philosophy that “less is more,” this layered family home by People Oriented Design offers an engaging contribution to the conversation about twenty-first-century Queensland architecture.