2016 National Architecture Awards: Residential Architecture – Houses (New) Award

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Rosalie House by Owen Architecture.

Rosalie House by Owen Architecture. Image: Toby Scott

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Rosalie House by Owen Architecture.

Rosalie House by Owen Architecture. Image: Toby Scott

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Rosalie House by Owen Architecture.

Rosalie House by Owen Architecture. Image: Toby Scott

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Rosalie House by Owen Architecture
Residential Architecture – Houses (New): National Award
Australian Institute of Architects

Jury citation

The Rosalie House immerses itself in its surrounding context so successfully that on first reading it appears to be a polite alteration to an existing dwelling. The skilfully resolved split-level plan works as an important divider of a series of garden vistas. Central to the plan is a retreat living space that operates as a pinwheel. This space is cleverly interrupted by social activation associated with movement through circulation. The primary living area is arranged around the kitchen, and large-format sliding doors allow internal spaces to unfold into the garden. The plan is essentially a series of pavilions linked by gable roof forms. Carefully resolved intersections assist the terracotta roof to successfully communicate the primary architectural expression. Extended eaves provide protection from weather and low eaves provide adequate shading to glazed walls that blur the distinction between inside and out. Sensible detailing and material selection are evident throughout, resulting in an expansive and respectful dwelling achieved through modest means.

Read the project review by Helen Norrie from Houses 109.


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