McGregor Coxall appoints three new members to its senior design team

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The new members of the McGregor Coxall Senior Design Team: Christian Borchert, David Knights and Tom Rivard.

The new members of the McGregor Coxall Senior Design Team: Christian Borchert, David Knights and Tom Rivard. Image: Courtesy of McGregor Coxall

McGregor Coxall has appointed Christian Borchert, Tom Rivard and David Knights to its senior design team.

Borchert will become a director and Melbourne studio leader, Rivard will be an associate and head of the urbanism sector for Australia and Knights will be an associate director and head of the environment sector.

A registered landscape architect with qualifications in architecture, Borchert has spent the past 12 years at McGregor Coxall as a designer on some of the company’s most prestigious projects including the Australian Garden at the National Gallery, Ballast Point Park in Sydney and more recently the University of Adelaide’s new clinical facility.

Rivard holds an architecture qualification from the University of Pennsylvania, has more than 25 years experience in architecture and urban design and is the curator of Urban Islands. He is currently completing a PhD and teaches at the University of Technology Sydney.

Knights is a water-sensitive urban design (WSUD) specialist who is joining McGregor Coxall after working at Alluvium, where he was a former director. Knights is an environmental engineer with more than 15 years’ experience in sustainable water management, waterway restoration and green infrastructure. He has worked with McGregor Coxall in a consulting capacity for numerous WSUD projects.

Founding director of McGregor Coxall, Adrian McGregor, said, “Christian, David and Tom bring wideranging project experience enhancing the capability and intelligence of our global studios.”


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