Melbourne Design Week 2017 program launched

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Robin Would Have Loved That: Man About The House. Pictured: Walsh Street House by Robin Boyd

Robin Would Have Loved That: Man About The House. Pictured: Walsh Street House by Robin Boyd

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International Design Project: Catenary Pottery Printer by GT2P.

International Design Project: Catenary Pottery Printer by GT2P. Image: GT2P

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The Victorian government has unveiled the 10-day-long program of events for Melbourne Design Week 2017.

The new initiative is a collaboration between the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) and the Victorian government and aims to promote Melbourne as one of the design capitals of the world.

“Being a creative state isn’t just about having great arts and cultural events – it’s about applying creative thinking and approaches to all aspects of our society. Design is central to this,” said Victoria’s Minister for Creative Industries Martin Foley.

The inaugural Melbourne Design Week (16-26 March 2017) is themed “design values” and asks, what does design value and how do we value design?

“The values of design often differ greatly from the way the public values design,” said Ewan McEoin, senior curator of the NGV’s Department of Contemporary Design and Architecture. “Designers value design as a process [whereas] the public generally values design as an object. So the program digs into that.”

“At a time when the world is in flux politically, socially and ecologically, what role does design have to play in responding to those things? Or is it actually responding to those things?”

The program comprises exhibitions, tours, panel discussions and industry events held at the NGV and as well as more than 70 satellite events at partner venues throughout the city.

From an analogue 3D printing project to a stand-up comedy show Robin Boyd would have loved, ArchitectureAU has the pick of the bunch for design and architecture highlights. 


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