2014 National Landscape Architecture Award: Land Management

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Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture.

Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture. Image: Andrew Lloyd

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Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture.

Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture. Image: Andrew Lloyd

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Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture.

Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture. Image: Andrew Lloyd

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Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture.

Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture. Image: Andrew Lloyd

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Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture.

Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture. Image: Andrew Lloyd

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Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture.

Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture. Image: Andrew Lloyd

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Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture.

Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture. Image: Andrew Lloyd

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Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture.

Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture. Image: Andrew Lloyd

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Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture.

Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture. Image: Andrew Lloyd

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Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture.

Toomuc Creek by Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture. Image: Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture

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2014 National Award for Land Management
Toomuc Creek
Fitzgerald Frisby Landscape Architecture

Jury comment

The environment of Toomuc Creek, on the edge of an expanding growth corridor, has been transformed by Fitzgerald Frisby from a highly modified agricultural landscape to a piece of vibrant green infrastructure. The project challenges the delicate relationship between habitat and open space provision in a well-researched collaboration between landscape architects, ecologists, artists and engineers.

The design-led approach actively negotiates the tension between ecological systems and open space networks. The result translates complex technical requirements into high-quality design initiatives with a strong ecological underpinning. This includes the creation of habitat specifically for growling grass frogs, separate from wetlands linked to the stormwater treatment and open space systems.

Small-scale interventions enrich the identity and experience of the place. An abstract artwork interprets the local hydrology, a secondary trail network morphs into a BMX track and a truck turning circle houses a netball court.


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