Coming soon: Koning Eizenberg’s upcoming projects

Part of our ongoing review of the work of 2019 Gold Medallists Hank Koning and Julie Eizenberg, we turn our attention to the architects’ future projects, with a collection of responses from peers and colleagues.

The architecture of Koning Eizenberg is never less than exceptional. Their buildings are thoughtful, resourceful, edgy, resilient, contextually intelligent, socially progressive and environmentally conscious. And now recognized by the Gold Medal.

The Student Pavilion at the University of Melbourne will feature a concrete frame that draws on the midcentury legacy of the
campus. Collaborators: Lyons (executive architect); masterplan with Aspect
Studios, NMBW, Architects EAT, Breathe Architecture, Greenaway Architects and Glas Landscape Architecture.

The Student Pavilion at the University of Melbourne will feature a concrete frame that draws on the midcentury legacy of the campus. Collaborators: Lyons (executive architect); masterplan with Aspect Studios, NMBW, Architects EAT, Breathe Architecture, Greenaway Architects and Glas Landscape Architecture.

Not withstanding a stellar career in Los Angeles as architects and educators, Hank and Julie have stayed Australian. They’re generously hospitable to visiting compatriots, providing a cultural bridge too. In 2015, merging conviviality with cultural discourse, they put me up and hosted a dinner where I presented Haig’s and my four decades as architectural editors and critics. We published their Santa Monica studio in UME 15 (2002).

Bravo and encore.

– Jackie Cooper and Haig Beck, editors and publishers, UME

The Student Pavilion at the University of Melbourne will feature a concrete frame that draws on the midcentury legacy of the
campus. Collaborators: Lyons (executive architect); masterplan with Aspect
Studios, NMBW, Architects EAT, Breathe Architecture, Greenaway Architects and Glas Landscape Architecture.

The Student Pavilion at the University of Melbourne will feature a concrete frame that draws on the midcentury legacy of the campus. Collaborators: Lyons (executive architect); masterplan with Aspect Studios, NMBW, Architects EAT, Breathe Architecture, Greenaway Architects and Glas Landscape Architecture.

Hank and Julie often challenge conformism in architecture, and most often their architectural journey is told with a good dose of humour. This I think encourages all in our profession, young or established, whether here in Australia or in their adopted home of California.

Their buildings speak of confidence, innovation and appropriateness. There is always an intellectual path mapped out, skilfully referring to culture, society and place. Optimism, beauty and clarity in their work results. That and their sense of care has inspired me over the years, and is cherished.

– Justin Hill FRAIA, director, Kerry Hill Architects

A 1890s library in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania will be “stripped back” for MuseumLab, highlighting the idea of discovery in this teen-oriented museum setting.

A 1890s library in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania will be “stripped back” for MuseumLab, highlighting the idea of discovery in this teen-oriented museum setting.

An embrace – and elevation – of everyday life sets Koning Eizenberg’s projects apart. The exuberance and vivacity exhibited across their range of work is possible because it stems from Hank and Julie’s own love of life, and love of working with others. Their ease of approach to daily life is distinctly Australian, with a Californian flair for equally considering inspiration from neighbourhood anecdotes, academia or a new TV show. The result is a rare kind of magic: at once comfortable, inviting and provocative.

– Rayne Laborde, UCLA CityLAB fellow and former employee at Koning Eizenberg Architecture

Source

Review

Published online: 28 Oct 2019
Words: Editorial Desk AAU

Issue

Architecture Australia, July 2019

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