Material palette: Virginia Kerridge Architect

The work of Virginia Kerridge Architect is textured and ages gracefully over time. The choice of materials and finishes, often recycled, gives an expressive quality to the spaces created.

Recycled timber

Recycled bricks and timber in the Lilyfield Warehouse.

Recycled bricks and timber in the Lilyfield Warehouse.

Image: Michael Nicholson

Virginia Kerridge enjoys the natural beauty of recycled timber. The floorboards seen here at the Lilyfield Warehouse add warmth and texture to the loft space.
aahardwoods.com.au

Recycled bricks

Rammed earth is a textural inspiration.

Rammed earth is a textural inspiration.

Image: Marcel Aucar

Like recycled timber, recycled bricks have the patina of age. Bricks are often reused from site, as seen here at the Lilyfield Warehouse.
thebrickpit.com.au

Rammed earth

Concrete flooring at White Rock House.

Concrete flooring at White Rock House.

Image: Tim Pascoe

The textural quality of rammed earth appeals to Virginia Kerridge. It also promotes the use of local materials, as seen here at the House in Country New South Wales. Wall sculpture: Shona Wilson.

Concrete

Concrete is versatile and its durability makes it a good material for flooring, as seen here at the White Rock House.
boral.com.au/concrete

Galvanized iron roof sheeting

Galvanized iron is a durable material, has a natural patina that develops over time and is appropriate in rural settings, as seen here at the House in Country New South Wales.
stramit.com.au

Corten steel

The rich colour of the corten steel complements the use of natural materials. At the Lilyfield Warehouse, pictured here, it has been used to create a pool.

Read a profile of Virginia Kerridge Architect from Houses 95.

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Published online: 11 Mar 2014
Images: Marcel Aucar, Michael Nicholson, Tim Pascoe

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Houses, December 2013

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