Endorsed by

National award for sustainable architecture

This is an article from the Architecture Australia archives and may use outdated formatting

UTAS SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE by SBE AND SIX DEGREES ARCHITECTS – ARCHITECTS IN COLLABORATION

JURY CITATION
The Tasmanian jury citation for this project observes that “the key to a truly sustainable architecture will depend on the creation of bridges that unite conservation technology with an earth-centric philosophy.” The UTAS School of Architecture exemplifies this approach, reusing an existing 1950s industrial shed and occupying it with a series of smaller buildings that address the functional and spatial requirements of the school programme.

Two strategic moves cement this project as an instructive and effective advocate for the minimization of environmental impacts. Firstly, the reuse of the existing building addresses the cultural sustainability and connectedness of this place while minimizing the use of new materials. This awareness of the embodied energy of an existing structure is important in an environment where sustainability often perverts to a strategy of consuming more materials and more systems.

Secondly, the minimization of energy requirements through the creation of smaller teaching spaces heated independently is an excellent lateral approach. The penalty for this is the variable temperature in the larger studio space, which the jury suspects will be addressed over time via programmatic adjustments – but to the benefit of the project and in accordance with the design strategy. The new work is constructed from low-emission materials and finishes with a high recycled content.

Perhaps the most important strategy is the inclusion of educational material throughout the spaces, which reminds our future architects on a daily basis of the decisions through which their school came into being and the mechanisms through which environmental impacts are addressed.

For further coverage see Architecture Australia vol 96 no 4, July/August 2007.

COUNCIL HOUSE 2 (CH2) by CITY OF MELBOURNE AND DESIGNINC MELBOURNE

JURY CITATION
This project extends the educational potential of sustainable building practices to an entire city, and for this decision alone both the client and the architects should be commended.

The project is the result of a “first principles” approach to the problems of sustainable design. The architectural expression of the building relies on these strategies and the support mechanisms required to maximize their potential. At times these elements have a certain whimsy – the shower towers on the east elevation, for example, and the brightly coloured rotating turbines on the roof.

Ongoing monitoring of the success of the measures taken here will form a valuable databank for other architects and should assist in the process of advocating such measures in other projects. The generosity of the City of Melbourne in funding such an extraordinary research and development device will be of value to the profession well into the future.

For further coverage see Architecture Australia vol 96 no 1, January/February 2007.

SQIT – BLOCK B by PROJECT SERVICES

JURY CITATION
Much of the debate in sustainable design centres on the relation between architectural expression and specialist elements addressing environmental concerns. In this regard, SQIT Block B is instructive on many levels – it indicates future directions, but with more than a glance to the past.

The extremity of the Toowoomba climate brings its own problems and opportunities, which have been deftly handled here. The building has an abundance of light (but little glare) and reservoirs of coolth in the thermal mass lying at its heart. Self-finishing materials with a proven endurance have been used.

Teaching also takes place. Building occupants are directly engaged with the success of the building’s performance (they are still finalizing their understanding of the ventilation and shading mechanisms). This in turn increases their engagement with and awareness of external conditions.

The seamless incorporation of sustainable measures into the architectural expression greatly impressed the jury, as did the architectural expression itself, which could be enjoyed in isolation of this issue. The project included a nod to Hertzberger and also to the tradition of Public Works projects – a tradition to which Don Watson has made fine contributions over the years. Thus, the building is an exemplar of future practice and a trip down memory lane – reminding us that these issues have been solved before and that a greater awareness of this history would stand the profession in good stead.

STAGE ONE ACE, KANGAN BATMAN TAFE by LYONS

JURY CITATION
Of all projects awarded in this category, Stage One ACE at Kangan Batman TAFE perhaps provides the clearest future direction in the intersection of commercial practice, design agendas and a desire to minimize environmental impact. It is a delicious irony that the building houses education facilities for car painting and bodywork, illustrating the dilemmas faced by the profession as we work to accommodate all aspects of society in a more sustainable manner.

The project emerged from the integrated practice model. A number of technical and performance issues were critical to this project, which involved the full range of consultants at an early stage to vet design decisions as they were being made. Thus, the gap between “architecture” and “sustainable building” is minimized – each element is multifunctional, which has positive effects on budget and procurement.

The jury hopes that the collaborative approach underpinning the design decisions – a collaboration directed and curated by the sure hand of the lead architect – becomes the standard model for future practice. This tendency is already evident in much contemporary architectural practice. Given that, it is to be hoped that the need for a reminder via our awards programme of the importance of minimizing environmental impact is nearly at an end.

Credits

Architect
DesignInc
Australia
Project Team
Mick Pearce, Stephen Webb, Chris Thorne, Jean Claude Bertoni, Aldona Pajdak, Jacinda Thornton, Rob Adams, Robert Lewis, Shane Poswer, Matt Plumbridge, Kate Gorman, Kate Senko, Ione McKenzie
Architect
City of Melbourne
Melbourne, Vic, Australia
Consultants
Acoustics Marshall Day Acoustics
Artist Janet Laurence, Cameron Robbins, David Wong.
Builder Hansen Yuncken Melbourne
Developer City of Melbourne
Environmental engineer Advanced Environmental Concepts
Interior design DesignInc, William Morgia, DesignInc, City of Melbourne (Aldona Pajdak, Juliet Moore
Landscape City of Melbourne
Quantity surveyor Donald Cant Watts Corke
Services engineer WSP Lincolne Scott
Structural and civil engineer Bonacci Group
Site details
Location Melbourne,  Vic,  Australia
Budget $51,000,000
Category Commercial / public buildings
Project Details
Status Built
Completion date 2006
Client
Client City of Melbourne
Website melbourne.vic.gov.au

Credits

Architect
Six Degrees Architects
Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic, Australia
Project Team
Peter Malatt, Simon O’Brien, Giles Lawson, Glenn Irwin, Chris Barnett, David Oppenheim, Erika Bartak, Luke Smeaton
Architect
Sustainable Built Environments
Australia
Consultants
3D services modelling Construction Modelling Australia
Acoustic consultant Watson Moss Growcott
Builder Vos Construction
Building surveyor Protek Building Surveying
Cost consultant Simon Wragg and Associates
Fire engineer Pitt and Sherry Building Consultants
Land surveyor GJ Walkem and Co
Landscaping TNLA
Services consultant Engineering Solutions Tasmania
Soil engineering BFP Consultants
Structural consultant George Apted & Associates
Site details
Location Launceston,  Tas,  Australia
Category Commercial / public buildings
Project Details
Status Built
Client
Client University of Tasmania – Asset Management

Credits

Architect
Project Services
Brisbane, Qld, Australia
Project Team
Don Watson, Marie-Anne Ammons, Stephen Sims, David Cox, Greg O'Brien, Robert Christie, Robert Nathan, Darryl Drysdale, Murat Varol, Mark Moseley, Peter Williams, Kerry Gray, Gary Green, Craig Pratt, Lawrence McKenna, Russell Clark, Michael Ryan, Alan Chau, John Lennon, Malcolm Telford, John Aitchison, John Coglan, Kevin Scully, Lachlan King, David Langley, Leo Briffa, Keith Starr, Greg Tunn, Judy Bott
Consultants
Builder Barclay Mowlem
Construction manager Colin Lewsey
Contract administration Jim'O'Day
Original builder Walter Construction Group (Queensland)
Site manager Steven Hickling, Tim Foreman
Site details
Location Toowoomba,  Qld,  Australia
Category Commercial / public buildings
Project Details
Status Built
Client
Client Department of Education, Training and the Arts

Credits

Architect
Lyons Architecture
Melbourne, Vic, Australia
Consultants
Acoustics Watson Moss Growcott
Builder Hansen Yuncken Melbourne
Building surveyor PLP Building Surveyors & Consultants
Facade engineer Connell Mott MacDonald
Fire services Bassett Kuttner Collins
Hydraulics Rimmington and Associates
Mechanical, electrical and fire engineer ULA
Project manager Carson Group
Quantity surveyor Wilde and Woollard
Structural consultant Robert Bird & Partners
Site details
Location Melbourne,  Vic,  Australia
Category Commercial / public buildings
Project Details
Status Built

Source

Archive

Published online: 1 Nov 2007

Issue

Architecture Australia, November 2007

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