Endorsed by

Great Dane: Noma Australia

How do you design a ten-week pop-up restaurant in Sydney with a 27,000-person waitlist, for one of the most famous chefs in the world? Foolscap Studio has the answer.

This is a story about a space in Sydney that the best restaurant in the world inhabited for ten weeks during the summer and autumn of 2016. It catered to 5,500 sittings, all met with wonderful reviews. The food will not be mentioned in this article … at least not until the end of the story.

Wandering through Barangaroo to meet Adele Winteridge and Dhiren Das of Foolscap Studio, the designers responsible for the Noma Australia pop-up space, I start thinking about the puzzle this project must have posed: how does an Australian design studio provide an environment for a Danish hospitality team to interpret Australian ingredients? Chef René Redzepi and his Noma team clearly have an idea of how they see Australia and how they want to explore and present their findings on the plate. We know he is one of the greatest chefs walking the planet, but this project wasn’t just about providing an inspired space to eat.

A Danish ethos, or at least what I imagine it to be, seems to sit so comfortably with Sydney. It is influenced by place, it is (largely) ethical, and it is materially aware. Indeed it could be said that without Scandinavia, the best of Australian Architecture (deliberate capitals) would be quite different. An argument could easily be mounted that our countries share many design sensibilities.

A long, low wall of adobe ran through the dining space. It was made from different coloured sands from New South Wales. Artwork: Dam2 by William Delafield Cook.

A long, low wall of adobe ran through the dining space. It was made from different coloured sands from New South Wales. Artwork: Dam2 by William Delafield Cook.

Image: Jason Loucas

Foolscap, with architectural collaborators Lend Lease, tapped straight into these sensibilities in the Noma pop-up, taking the imagined and giving it substance. The space exuded material awareness. A frontispiece wall of layered adobe that used different coloured sands from New South Wales stood sentinel to the gastronomic experience beyond. Winteridge dubbed it “the Instagram wall” as it was the spot where countless people “selfied up” in the ten weeks the pop-up was open. Diners were then shifted left to an intimate dining space that accommodated about fifty people. To the right was the kitchen, where ninety or so staff turned out the amazing for those lucky enough to have had a sitting. It was an open kitchen located just in the field of view of diners, also open for inspection on a trip to the loo.

The dining space itself was effective and refined. A long, low wall of adobe ran through the dining space, defining a service and prep bar and separating the dining space from the service areas behind it. Behind the adobe wall, a subtly detailed wall with a brass midrail and LED strip lighting created an analogous effect along the eastern edge of the space, reminiscent of a sunrise or a Tim Storrier fire painting. The sunrise analogy is exactly what Foolscap Studio intended – the sun rising in the east and then, as the evening dinner sitting rolled on, the sunset rolling in through the west-facing glazing, and the late summer daylight bouncing across the harbour water before setting behind the city beyond.

The dining space accommodated about fifty people per sitting.

The dining space accommodated about fifty people per sitting.

Image: Jason Loucas

The tables themselves were stage sets for the food. Each was simply lit by a single downlight. The specially commissioned earthen-ware crockery by local ceramicists Paul Davis and Jacqueline Clayton was delightful in itself, and a perfect entablature for the real star of the show, the food. The seating too was recessive, in deep-stained Carl Hansen chairs with wallaby fur throws, adding a touch of luxurious sophistication to the space. Strategically placed artworks by William Delafield Cook, specially commissioned for the pop-up, completed the setting.

A subplot to Noma Australia is that while it showcased Australian ingredients, it was also a vehicle to showcase Denmark. Apart from the brilliance of the Noma team in the kitchen, Danish designs, such as Kvadrat fabric curtains, Troldtekt sound attenuation, Scanpan kitchenware and the aforementioned Carl Hansen furniture, all featured in the space.

I can’t help noticing that on some level there were similarities with a certain young Danish architect who tried to imagine Australia from afar some fifty-odd years ago. The Australian-Danish Gaze is such a powerful force that the imaginings of that young Danish architect have actually become a critically entwined symbol of how we define ourselves today. No doubt the brief time that the Noma team spent in Sydney will also generate its own feedback loop that will influence our local chefs for some time to come.

And for the record, I did eat at Noma – I was offered a biscuit that was baked especially for the Noma team by a fan of the restaurant who just wanted to give them something in appreciation of their work over the years. The biscuit was awesome.

Products and materials

Walls and ceilings
Whirlwind textured wall finish by Maharam. Custom rammed earth walls. Walls in dining room and kitchen painted in Dulux ‘Klavier.’ Troldtekt acoustic panelling to ceiling.
Windows
Kosmos 2 drapery to windows from Kvadrat.
Flooring
Custom-designed, hand-trowelled render flooring.
Lighting
Architectural lighting by Light Project. Blackjack table lamp from Toss B.
Furniture
CH37 chair and custom-designed dining room tables by Carl Hansen.
Other
Concrete vessels by Studio Twocan. Custom-designed tableware by Paul Davis and Jacqueline Clayton. Custom-desigend Kanmantoo Bluestone door handles. Floral arrangements by Joost Bakker. Dam2 artwork by William Delafield Cook.

Credits

Design practice
Foolscap Studio
Melbourne, Vic, Australia
Project Team
Adele Winteridge, Kathrin Wheib, Dhiren Das, Emily Gillis
Architectural collaborator
Lend Lease
Australia
Consultants
Builder and project manager Promena Projects
Lighting Light Project
Site details
Location Sydney,  NSW,  Australia
Site type Urban
Category Interiors
Type Hospitality, Restaurants
Project Details
Status Built
Design, documentation 5 months
Construction 3 months

Source

Project

Published online: 21 Dec 2016
Words: David Welsh
Images: Jason Loucas

Issue

Artichoke, September 2016

More projects

See all
The floating roof ties together the home’s concrete and timber elements and gives lightness to its form. Tropical textures: Cove House

A thoughtful response to its unique setting and climate in the Gold Coast’s Sanctuary Cove, this house, by Justin Humphrey Architect, embodies principles of subtropical …

Sliding panels and bifold doors allow the interior to return to its original singular volume. Artwork: Elliott “Numskull” Routledge. ‘Changing the performance’: Camperdown Warehouse

Fusing concepts inherent in furniture design and architecture, this conversion of a former motor vehicle factory in Sydney serves as a prototype for a novel …

On the northern verandah, netted hammock seats lean in unison with the architecture, appearing to float over and into the landscape. Trademark lyricism: Stradbroke House

Well versed in designing for the tropical Queensland climate, the Gabriel and Elizabeth Poole and Tim Bennetton have collaborated to deliver an exuberant South Stradbroke …

The primary living space in Tierney Drive House is bush-bound, locating its inhabitants in a kind of pre-suburban site condition. Subtle occupation: Tierney Drive House

At once fluid and contained, this family home embraces the opportunities for connection and retreat offered by its sloping, bush-bound site near the Gold Coast’s …

Calendar