RAIA State Awards

This is an article from the Architecture Australia archives and may use outdated formatting. Email us if you would like us to consider upgrading it to the current format.

The first instalment of the RAIA state awards, leading to the nationals in Canberra on 17th November.

      

Victorian Winners left: The Victorian Architecture Medal Holyoake Cottage by Field Consultants. centre: New Residential, Award of Merit Carter/Tucker Residence by Sean Godsell Architects. right: BHP Colorbond Award; Marion Mahony Award Box Hill Institute Nelson Campus – Stage 2 by Lyons.

The RAIA Awards program has again thrust architecture into the limelight. In this issue we list award winners from New South Wales, Victoria, Western Australia and Tasmania. The next issue will feature South Australia, ACT, Queensland, and Northern Territory winners.

In this Olympic year, the  New South Wales  Awards attracted a record 143 entries. “There was a lot of work because of the Olympics, and the general building boom here, but the good news is that it has translated into a very good standard rather than the opposite, which is sometimes the case,” said jury chair Kerry Clare. “We discerned a sensitivity that has been respectful as far as the public realm and the environment goes, which were two issues of importance to the jury.”

In the absence of “in your face” heroic buildings, Kerry says the jury concentrated on discerning the subtle strengths of the key projects. “There are some very intelligent buildings being produced,” she said. “For example, the Tennis Centre (Bligh Voller Nield) is quite a robust building, not finessed in the way you might expect of a Sulman Prize winner but the work, environmentally, was so well done. On the other hand, the Scientia (MGT Architects) was a highly polished building, but we weren’t overawed by that. It was the broad picture of the public realm that the building responded to so well that impressed us.”

In commercial and public projects, Kerry has observed a move towards solutions that respond sensitively to public needs. “The shift has come from a lot of the commercial clients. They have gone past total rationalisation, concentrating on ‘core business’, and so on. As architects we are able to talk more holistically with them.”

In  Western Australia , Exmouth’s new international aiport at Learmonth RAAF Base by Jones Coulter Young took out the prestigious George Temple Poole Award, as well as the BHP Steel Award, and was applauded by the jury as a “jewel gleaming in the bush landscape of Exmouth”. Another noteworthy commendation was Central Perth’s 40-year-old Council House refurbishment by Peter Hunt and Daryl Jackson Architects. Not so long ago the building was scheduled for demolition – now it has been updated in terms of disability access, airconditioning and security while remaining consistent with the original Howlett and Bailey design.

In  Tasmania , innovative residential and conservation projects dominated the field, reflecting the burgeoning creative spirit in the Apple Isle. “We had 18 months of recession in the building industry, but the last six to nine months have been very bouyant,” said Tasmanian Chapter President Damian Rogers. “But people have been doing things on very tight budgets, so architects have been forced to be clever – to do a lot with very little. The future of architecture in Tasmania is looking at how we can find new uses for old buildings. With a stagnant population growth, we don’t need so many new buildings, but we do need to keep our heritage alive,” he said.

One major award, the Triennial James Blackburn Award for Residential Buildings, went to Leigh Wooley for a residential extension. “It’s very unusual to give a major award to something that’s essentially just a one-room extension, but the meticulous care and effort he put in to it, and the fact that he changed the whole function of the house, impressed the jury. It was more like a piece of joinery,” said Damian. “As there isn’t much money around, people are putting their design energies into smaller projects.”

Peter Crone, chair of  Victoria ’s Awards Committee, made a similar observation about the residential projects which impressed his fellow jury members. He believes the jury took a very fair-minded approach to assessing projects, taking low budget houses as seriously as the more salubrious dwellings. “The project I’m really enthusiastic about is the small house by Field Consultants, the winner of the Victorian Architecture Medal,” said Peter. “It is such an innovative project, on a tight budget, a tight site, and it posed a lot of problems to get it through planning. As an award winner, it conveys a positive message to the public – a lot of people are turned off architecture if they are constantly looking at million dollar houses.”

In Victoria, the large number of educational projects reflects a healthy growth in the sector. Overall, said Peter, the picture is a healthy one for practitioners – especially for young firms on their way up. “It’s maintaining a momentum that was building up through the nineties. It’s going to get better, and young firms are going to be able to make their presence felt.”
Julie Oliver

     

                              

Victorian Winners top left: Institutional, William Wardell Award RMIT Printing Facility, Brunswick Campus by John Wardle Architects and Demaine Partnership in association. top right: Residential Alterations and Extensions, Award of Merit Richmond Warehouse by Shelley Penn Architect. middle left: Residential Alterations and Extensions, Award of Merit Kew Residence by John Wardle Architects. middle centre: New Residential, Award of Merit Curtis Residence by Wood Marsh Architecture. middle right: New Residential, Award of Merit Emery Residence by Denton Corker Marshall. bottom: Commercial, Sir Osborne McCutcheon Award LUXE Stages 1 and 2 by Neometro Architects. 

VICTORIA
The Victorian Architecture Medal—Holyoake Cottage by Field Consultants. Melbourne Prize—Observatory Gate, Royal Botanic Gardens by Peter Elliott Architects. Melbourne Prize Commendation—Catholic Theological College by Gregory Burgess Architects. BHP Colorbond Award—Box Hill Institute Nelson Campus – Stage 2 by Lyons. Commercial: Sir Osborne McCutcheon Award—LUXE Stages 1 and 2 by Neometro Architects. Commercial New: Award of Merit—Document Printing Australia Headquarters by Metier 3 Architects. Commendations (2)—Space Showroom – Exterior by Woods Bagot; George Low of Melbourne Warehouse Office by Garner Davis Architects. Ecologically Sustainable Development: Award of Merit—Inverleigh Primary School – New Classroom Block by Cowland North Architects & Interior Designers. Institutional: William Wardell Award—RMIT Printing Facility, Brunswick Campus by John Wardle Architects and Demaine Partnership in association. Institutional New: Awards of Merit (2)—The Children’s Court of Victoria, Melbourne, by Bates Smart Melbourne; Observatory Gate, Royal Botanic Gardens by Peter Elliott Architects. Commendation—Bendigo Regional Institute of TAFE, Capital Works Program Saleyards Stages 2 and 3 by BSA/Sinclair Knight Merz. Institutional Alterations and Extensions: Commendations (2)—McClelland Gallery, Langwarrin by Williams & Boag; Box Hill Institute – Automotive School by Lyons. Interior Architecture: Marion Mahony Award—Box Hill Institute Nelson Campus – Stage 2 by Lyons. Award of Merit—Lehrer Residence by Edmond & Corrigan. Commendations (2)—Victorian Arts Centre, Level 5 Works (Patrons Lounge and Public Toilets) by Woods Bagot; Rear Warehouse Conversion by Tim O’Sullivan Architect in conjunction with Sioux Clark/Multiplicity. Residential: Harold Desbrowe-Annear Award—Holyoake Cottage by Field Consultants. Residential Alterations and Extensions: Awards of Merit (2)—Kew Residence by John Wardle Architects; Richmond Warehouse by Shelley Penn Architect. Residential Multiple: Award of Merit—The Open Door and Flagstaff Crisis Accommodation by John Wardle Architects. Residential New: Awards of Merit (4)—Emery Residence by Denton Corker Marshall; Carter/Tucker Residence by Sean Godsell Architects; Curtis Residence by Wood Marsh Architecture; House C by Daniel Van Cleemput. Urban Design: Joseph Reed Award—RMIT University Urban Spaces Project Stage One by Peter Elliott Architects in association with the City of Melbourne, City Projects Division. Awards of Merit (2)—Docklands Infrastructure by Wood Marsh Architecture; Commonwealth Law Courts Forecourt by Hassell. The Access Award: Award Winner—Sport and Recreation Facility (Stage 1), Victoria University – Werribee by Heymann Kollegger Beyer. Award of Merit—Apartments at Braeside Park – Berwick by Allen Kong Architect. The Bates Smart Award: Bates Smart Award for Architecture in the Media—Melbourne Architecture: A Guide to Melbourne Architecture by Dr Philip Goad. Commendation—Backlogue – Journal of the HalfTime Club – Vol 3 by Dean Boothroyd and Gina Levenspiel.

                

            

                    

New South Wales Winners top left: Joint Sulman Award NSW Tennis Centre Court by Bligh Voller Nield. top centre: Housing, Architecture Award Rockpool by Alex Popov Architects. top right: Housing, Architecture Award Reeves House by Stutchbury & Pape & Sue Harper in association. middle left: Joint Sulman Award The Scientia by MGT Architects. middle right: Housing, Wilkinson Award Marshall Residence by Sam Marshall Architect. bottom left: Commercial Building, Architecture Award Sydney Qantas Domestic Terminal by Hassell. bottom centre: Commercial Building, Architecture Award 363 George Street by Denton Corker Marshall. bottom right: Interior Architecture, Architecture Award Gibbeson Litynski House by Stanic Harding Architects

NEW SOUTH WALES
Public Buildings: Joint Sulman Award—NSW Tennis Centre Court by Bligh Voller Nield; The Scientia by MGT Architects. Commendation—Manly Hydraulics by NSW Government Architect’s Office. Commercial Buildings: Architecture Awards (3)—490 Crown Street by Alexander Tzannes & Associates & Peter Reed Associates; 363 George Street by Denton Corker Marshall, Sydney; Qantas Domestic Terminal by Hassell. Jury Award – Artwork—Water sculpture at 363 George Street by Jennifer Turpin and Michaelie Crawford. Housing: Wilkinson Award—Marshall Residence by Sam Marshall Architect. Architecture Awards (3)—Apartments at Newington by HPA Architects & Planners & Bruce Eeles & Vote Associates; Rockpool by Alex Popov Architects; Reeves House by Stutchbury & Pape & Sue Harper in association. Commendations (3)—Coogee House by Renato D’Ettore Architect; Oxford Street Development by Candalepas & Associates and Wilkinson Candalepas & Associates; Morley House by Jahn Associates Architects. Conservation: Greenway Award—No named award. Architecture Awards (2)—Texgroup by Gordon & Valich; Marshall Residence by Sam Marshall Architect. Commendations (3)—Civic Hotel by M + N Architects; St Mary’s Cathedral by NSW Department of Public Works and Services; Customs House by Tonkin Zulaikha Architects in association with Jackson Teece Chesterman Willis. Civic Design: Lloyd Rees Award—University of NSW by MGT, Bligh Voller Nield, Jackson Teece Chesterman Willis and the Capital Development Branch at UNSW. Architecture Award—Olympic Lighting Towers by Tonkin Zulaikha Architects. Commendation—Moore Park Bus Station by Bligh Voller Nield. Interior Architecture: Architecture Award—Gibbeson Litynski House by Stanic Harding Architects. Commendation—Wine Banc by McConnell Rayner. Environment/EED + ESD: Architecture Award—Olympic Lighting Towers by Tonkin Zulaikha Architects. Commendations (2)—Institute of Languages by Jackson Teece Chesterman Willis; Charles Sturt Teaching Complex by Marci Webster Mannison, CSU Office of Design. Country Division Awards: Blacket Award—Blue Mountains River Run by Mason Architects. Commendations (2)—Central Coast Campus by Perumal Pedavoli; Charles Sturt University, School of Environmental & Information Sciences by Marci Webster Mannison, CSU Office of Design. Boral Timber Award—Lippman House by Ed Lippman. BHP Colorbond Award—NSW Tennis Centre, Centre Court by Bligh Voller Nield. Premier’s Award—Four Horizons Eco Lodges, Watagan National Park, Hunter Valley by Lindsay Johnston. Marion Mahony Griffin Award—Joan Domicelj. Adrian Ashton Award—Kate Stewart – editorship of Architectural Review Australia 1995-1999; “The Tin Man” by Catherine Hunter of the Sunday Program TCN 9

      

Tasmanian Winners top left: New and Extended Buildings Award Sustainable Sheds, Bay of Fires Lodge by Ken Latona. top right: Residential Award Bennison Read House by Leigh Woolley/Craig Rosevear Architects. bottom: Interior Architecture Award Masonic Club of Tasmania refurbishment, Boutique Hotel by Reinmuth Blythe Balmforth Terroir.

TASMANIA
Residential: Awards (2)—McGregor House by James Morrison & Yvette Breytenbach Architects; Bennison Read House by Leigh Woolley/Craig Rosevear Architects. BHP Colorbond Steel Award—Bennison Read House by Leigh Woolley/Craig Rosevear Architects. New and Extended Buildings: Award—Sustainable Sheds, Bay of Fires Lodge by Ken Latona. Commendations (2)—The Hutchins School, Early Learning Centre by Heffernan Button Voss Architects; Kingborough Civic Centre by Jacob Allom Wade. Interior Architecture: Award— Masonic Club of Tasmania refurbishment, Boutique Hotel by Reinmuth Blythe Balmforth Terroir. Commendation—Picasso For Hair by Jacob Allom Wade. Conservation: Award— Launceston Custom House by Forward Viney & Partners. Triennial James Blackburn Award for Residential Buildings: Award—Dunne Residence by Leigh Woolley Architect. Commendation—McKinlay House by Mark Drury/Mark Drury & Partners Architects. SWT Blythe Award for Students— Daniel Lane.

              

Western Australia Winners top left: George Temple Poole Award; Public Institutional, Architecture Awards; 2000 BHP Steel Award Learmonth International Airport by Jones Coulter Young Architects and Urban Designers. top centre: Interior, Architecture Award Heytesbury Holdings Office Fitout by Ross Donaldson Architects. top right: Single Residential. Architecture Award Residence – Mundaring Weir Road by Jung Hunziker. bottom: Residential Alterations and Additions, Architecture Award Miller Residence by Richard Szklarz Architects.

WESTERN AUSTRALIA
George Temple Poole Award—Learmonth International Airport by Jones Coulter Young Architects and Urban Designers. Commercial: Architecture Award—Chamber of Commerce and Industry of WA by Parry & Rosenthal. Commendations (2)—Mezzonine by Michael Patroni; Howard Park Winery by Jones Coulter Young Architects and Urban Designers. Recycled: Architecture Award—The Old Tannery by Jones Coulter Young Architects and Urban Designers. Commendations (2)—Council House (refurbishment and underground car park) by Peter Hunt & Daryl Jackson Architects; Heathcote Redevelopment by Parry & Rosenthal. Interior: Architecture Award— Heytesbury Holdings Office Fitout by Ross Donaldson Architects. Commendations (2)—Lamonts Restaurant by Ross Donaldson Architects; The Old Tannery by Jones Coulter Young Architects and Urban Designers. Civic Design: Architecture Award—Heathcote Redevelopment by Parry & Rosenthal. Single Residential: Architecture Award—Residence – Mundaring Weir Road by Jung Hunziker. Commendations (3)—Residence, Subi Centro by Hillam Design Partners; The Old Tannery by Jones Coulter Young Architects and Urban Designers; House – Yallingup by Dennis Silver Architect. Residential Alterations and Additions: Architecture Award—Miller Residence by Richard Szklarz Architects. Multiple Housing: Commendation—10 Stone Street by Hillam Design Partners. Duplex/Triplex: Commendation—123 Glendower Street by Hillam Design Partners. Heritage Conservation: Architecture Award—St Brigids Convent by John Taylor Architect. Public Institutional: Architecture Awards (2)—TVW Telethon Institute for Child Health Research by Cox Howlett & Bailey Woodland/Oldfield Knott Architects in association; Learmonth International Airport by Jones Coulter Young. 2000 BHP Steel Award—Learmonth International Airport by Jones Coulter Young.


More archive

Most read