Architecture Australia, March 2020

Architecture Australia, March 2020

Architecture Australia

Provocative, informative and engaging discussion of the best built works and the issues and events that matter.

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Architecture Australia March/April 2020
Preview | Katelin Butler | 10 Mar 2020

AA March/April 2020 preview

Architecture, agency and dialogue: Enshrining shared values in the built environment

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The proposed plaza and building on Sydney's George Street designed by David Adjaye and Daniel Boyd.
Discussion | Carroll Go-Sam | 26 May 2020

Future Indigeneity: Shared values in the built environment

In recognition of National Reconciliation Week, Carroll Go-Sam outlines how new approaches to design, agency and participation are securing the future of Indigeneity and reshaping architecture.

On an undulating Australian landscape, the house introduces a repeated, geometric architectural ordering.
Projects | Des Smith | 30 Apr 2020

Architectural poetry: House in the Hills

Defined by its rectilinear parasol of timber batten and set on a working sheep farm in regional Victoria, this house prioritizes clarity over pragmatism, geometric consistency over lavishness, purity and poetry over function.

The centre is topped by a grand, cantilevering, 40-square-metre parasol structure. It is civic in scale, providing a powerful marker in the landscape.
Projects | Cameron Bruhn | 19 May 2020

Architectural egalitarianism: Kingborough Community Hub

Built on the edge of the town of Kingston, Tasmania, this community hub is envisioned as the heart of a suburb that does not yet exist. How might an urban square and community facility attract and serve in the urban fringe?

The oversized arches, with their black mullions and dark glass, recall both Louis Sullivan’s National Farmers’ Bank of Owatonna and the Harbour Bridge.
Projects | Mark Raggatt | 4 May 2020

Recalling bygone grandeur: Rail Operations Centre

Memorializing the tectonics of tunnels, bridges and nineteenth-century suburban train stations, this red-brick, big-box building in inner-city suburban Sydney is a rich form of infrastructure architecture that represents an investment in workers and in the area’s rapidly changing urban fabric.

The nine-metre-high tower is clad in stained Tasmanian hardwood, coarse in texture and rich in the scent of ash and eucalypt.
Projects | Louis Anderson Mokak | 26 May 2020

Memory keeper: In Absence

A collaboration between architect and artist, this poignant work in the gardens of the National Gallery of Victoria challenges the colonial legacy of art institutions, interrogating the absence of truth in the western canon and asking: how can architecture reconcile with the brutality of an unlawful and violent colonial history?